Last edited by Shajas
Thursday, July 16, 2020 | History

2 edition of Japanese attitudes toward energy conservation and nuclear power found in the catalog.

Japanese attitudes toward energy conservation and nuclear power

Misa Kiyota

Japanese attitudes toward energy conservation and nuclear power

by Misa Kiyota

  • 310 Want to read
  • 27 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Energy conservation -- Japan -- Public opinion.,
  • Nuclear energy -- Japan -- Public opinion.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Misa Kiyota.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationviii, 97 leaves, bound :
    Number of Pages97
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16655669M

    Solar power in Japan has been expanding since the late s. The country is a leading manufacturer of solar panels and is in the top 5 ranking for countries with the most solar photovoltaics (PV) installed. In Japan had the third largest solar capacity in the world (behind Germany and Spain), with most of it grid connected. The solar insolation is good at about to kWh/(m²day).   As the scale of the Fukushima disaster has become clearer, the mood in Japan has started to turn against nuclear power. Recent polls have .

      The Japanese boast of their eco-services for eco-products in eco-cities. Yet they rely primarily on imported fossil fuel and nuclear power, live in energy-wasteful homes, and import 60% of their food. That may be changing in the wake of the Fukushima nuclear disaster. Maybe. Japan is at a crucial tipping s:   Renewable energy sources contributed more new energy over the last decade than coal and nuclear energy combined, and currently provide twice as much primary energy as nuclear power.

      Japan’s environment minister has hailed a 'turning point' in his country’s climate change policy after vowing to slash its much-criticised support for coal power in the developing world.   This is the third in a series of reports on Japan’s energy policy. Nuclear power has been considered quite beneficial in every aspect of the so-called 3E’s (energy security, economy and.


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Japanese attitudes toward energy conservation and nuclear power by Misa Kiyota Download PDF EPUB FB2

We conducted Internet surveys to evaluate Japanese attitudes toward nuclear power and energy-saving behavior after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Disaster. In the first part of the paper, we examined the relationship between socioeconomic characteristics and acceptance of nuclear power in light of global by: As other low-carbon energy sources — such as solar or wind — overcome limitations to widespread use, nuclear energy may play an important role as a "transition" energy to a low-carbon future.

However, the meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant after a tsunami struck the coast of Japan in revived historical fears and set. How have Japanese attitudes toward nuclear power changed since the March Fukushima nuclear disaster, and where does energy stand as an issue of concern relative to health-care or the economy.

The vast majority of Japanese now do. To prevent global warming, enhanced use of nuclear power generation that emits no greenhouse gases is indispensable. The envisioned revision to Japan’s Strategic Energy Plan should include a clear expression of support for the construction of new nuclear power.

The attitude of local communities near a nuclear power plant (NPP) is a key factor in nuclear policy decision making in Japan. This case study compared local citizens' attitudes in and toward the benefits and drawbacks of hosting Kashiwazaki–Kariwa NPP.

Cited by:   The relevant literature includes reports only of studies of attitudes about prior nuclear power plant accidents (Eiser et al.,Lindell and Perry,Verplanken, ) and changes in non-Japanese people's attitudes about the Fukushima nuclear accident (Hartmann et al.,Prati and Zani,Visschers and Siegrist, ; Wiwattanapantuwong et al.

Enhancing zero-carbon energy is an urgent task as the Japanese government aims to derive 44 percent of power from renewable and nuclear power by Energy tax. Some countries employ energy or carbon taxes to motivate energy users to reduce their consumption.

Carbon taxes can motivate consumption to shift to energy sources with less emissions of carbon dioxide, such as solar power, wind power, hydroelectricity or nuclear power while avoiding cars with combustion engines, jet fuel, oil, fossil gas and coal. 5. Discussion. Presenting public attitudes toward nuclear energy is an important issue in deciding national energy-related policies.

As presented in the results, the public showed positive emotions when there were positive events related to nuclear energy, including the export of nuclear reactors to the Netherlands, Jordan, and Saudi Arabia.

Having learned this, the energy plan’s target of having nuclear power account for 20 to 22 percent of the nation’s electricity supply in — while stating that Japan will try to reduce.

The fact that familiarity increases public support for nuclear energy is apparent from the very favorable attitudes of people who live near nuclear power plants. In addition to national surveys conducted at least twice a year, NEI sponsors biennial surveys of people living within a mile radius of any US nuclear power plant.

Public attitudes towards nuclear power plays an important role in energy policy-making because the use of nuclear power and relevant siting issues usually cause public resistance that results in project delays and even the failure of nuclear policy (Glaser, ).

Under the background of nuclear expansion plan in China, it is helpful to know. Public attitudes to nuclear power are critical in shaping nuclear policies in OECD/NEA countries and the latter will only be able to make use of this energy source if a well-informed public considers that its benefits outweigh its risks.

This report provides a number of insights into public attitudes towards nuclear power. Prior to the Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, Japan had generated 30% of its electrical power from nuclear reactors and planned to increase that share to 40%.

Nuclear power energy was a national strategic priority in Japan. As of Februaryof the 54 nuclear reactors in Japan, there were 42 operable reactors but only 9 reactors in 5 power plants were actually operating.

Downloadable. Despite its potential risks, nuclear power energy offers some economic benefits including cheap electricity.

This benefit clarifies part of the reason why people support nuclear energy. Our research examined whether there was a difference in the acceptance of nuclear energy across 27 European countries inbefore the Fukushima accident.

This statistic represents Japan’s nuclear energy consumption between and Inthis country’s consumption of nuclear energy amounted to approximately exajoules. In an interview with the Financial Times, Japan’s environment minister Shinjiro Koizumi has hailed a “turning point” in his country’s climate change policy after vowing to slash its much-criticised support for coal power in the developing world.

A majority of Democrats oppose expanding each of these energy sources while moderate/liberal Republicans fall somewhere in the middle on these issues.

The political divide over expanding nuclear energy is smaller. Some 57% of conservative Republicans, and 51% of all Republicans, favor more nuclear power plants. This chapter addresses the question of whether nuclear power can be a part of a sustainable energy transition by examining the present state and future prospects of nuclear energy.

Currently nuclear. Japanese events affect attitude towards nuclear power plants in Estonia. Explosions in the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan have created active protest against nuclear energy in Western Europe and Estonian economy and coruscations minister Juhan Parts said that the Estonian government will also have to take into account the change of.

Public opinion on nuclear issues is the aggregate of attitudes or beliefs held by the adult population concerning nuclear power, nuclear weapons and uranium ing to environmentalist Stewart Brand and James Lovelock, the debate on nuclear power is far from being evidence-based and rational, with a number of anti-nuclear organizations trying to pull it into an "absolute evil.

The MaFukushima nuclear incident in Japan made international headlines for months, but it also changed Japanese attitudes towards nuclear a devastating tsunami hit Japan.Prior to Fukushima, about 30 percent of Japan’s electricity was generated by nuclear power, and Japan’s Basic Energy Plan called for nuclear power’s share to increase to 50 percent by